Best answer: Why was Ghana willing to trade gold for salt?

Ghana itself was rich in ​gold​. People wanted gold for its beauty, but they needed salt in their diets to survive. Salt, which could be used to preserve food, also made bland food tasty. These qualities made salt very valuable.

Why was salt so valuable that it was traded for gold?

In the forests of West Africa, salt was very scarce so they had to trade for it and it literally was more valuable than gold. You could not live on gold. This is kind of obvious but salt was needed to flavor food, preserve food, its used for medical purposes ad to keep the body healthy.

Did Ghanaians trade salt for gold?

The king of Ghana also used his power to spread international trade. At its peak, Ghana was chiefly bartering gold, ivory and slaves for salt from Arabs and horses, cloth, swords and books from North Africans and Europeans. Back then, salt was worth its weight in gold.

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Why did salt become so important in African trade?

Once cultures began relying on grain, vegetable, or boiled meat diets instead of mainly hunting and eating roasted meat, adding salt to food became an absolute necessity for maintaining life. Because the Akan lived in the forests of West Africa, they had few natural resources for salt and always needed to trade for it.

What was salt used for in Africa during the Ghana Empire?

Much of the salt was mined in the Sahara Desert at the city of Taghaza where slaves were used to mine salt. Salt was sometimes used as money and was about as valuable as gold.

How did the Kingdom of Ghana become wealthy from the African gold salt trade?

Ghana grew wealthy from trade through taxation. Along with gold and salt traders carried copper, silver, cloth and spices. As Ghana was in a prime location in between salt and gold mines, rulers taxed traders passing through Ghana. Traders had to pay taxes on the goods they carried to Ghana and took away with them.

What was the African gold salt trade?

Gold from Mali and other West African states was traded north to the Mediterranean, in exchange for luxury goods and, ultimately, salt from the desert. The merchants for these routes were often Berbers, who had extensive knowledge of how to navigate through the desert.

Why did the gold salt trade develop between West Africa and North Africa?

Why did the gold-salt trade develop between West Africa and North Africa? … The trade began due to a surplus of each product per area. Gold was plentiful in West Africa so traders sent the item to North Africa so they too could have the valuable mineral. In return, North Africans gave salt to West Africa.

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How did the African gold salt trade influence African societies?

Salt was their major trade good but they also brought luxury items like glassware, fine cloth, and manufactured goods. In addition, with these trade goods came the Islamic religion, ideas in art and architecture, and cultural practices.

When did the gold and salt trade start?

The Trans-Saharan Gold Trade (7th–14th Century) Around the fifth century, thanks to the availability of the camel, Berber-speaking people began crossing the Sahara Desert.

How did the gold salt trade in western Africa facilitate the diffusion of ideas?

As a result of the gold and salt trade, cultural diffusion also occurred. The arabic language and Islamic religion were also spread along these trade routes. -The Empire derived power and wealth from gold. -Introduction of the camel in the Trans-Saharan trade boosted the amount of goods that could be transported.

What did Ghana trade?

At its peak, Ghana was chiefly bartering gold, ivory, and slaves for salt from Arabs and horses, cloth, swords, and books from North Africans and Europeans. … As salt was worth its weight in gold, and gold was so abundant in the kingdom, Ghana achieved much of its wealth through trade with the Arabs.

Why did traders in Africa trade a pound of gold for a pound of salt?

In West Africa gold mined south of the Sahel was traded for salt mined in the desert. The salt from the desert was needed by the people of Sahel to flavor and preserve their food and the gold had obvious value, especially in trading with the European people.

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Why was salt the most important trading commodity in the Sahara?

Explain why salt was the most important trading commodity in the Sahara? … It made migration and trade much more difficult due to the rough conditions.