What do waist beads mean in Nigeria?

Waist beads are a traditional African accessory that consist of small glass beads on a string or wire worn around the waist or hips. … In Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, and other West African countries, waist beads are a symbol of femininity, fertility, sensuality, and spiritual well-being.

Are waist beads supposed to be seen?

Waist beads can be visible as a symbol of femininity, celebration, or aristocracy, or hidden as a way of self-care or confidence or intimate appeal. There are many reasons why waist beads were, and still are, an intricate aspect of African (and now American) culture.

What do waist beads mean in Yoruba culture?

Pregnancy – waist beads are believed to enhance fertility. … There is a popular belief in Yoruba land that “it is the beads that make the buttocks to shake.” Spiritual Protection – the Orisas, devotees of water deities and priestesses wear waist beads as a means of protection from malicious water spirits.

What is the story behind waist beads?

African waist beads were made popular by the Yoruba tribe of Nigeria. These beads have been noted to have been worn as early as the 15th century for many purposes such as rites of passage and as a status symbol. … It is believed that the beads possess the power to attract as well as evoke deep emotional responses.

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Why do females wear waist beads?

Some are worn to provide protection for the mother and growing baby. Some women wear waist beads to keep track of their weight. … When you gain weight, the beads will sit higher on the waist or feel tight. And if you were to lose weight, the beads will feel loose and fall further down to the hips.

What do African beads symbolize?

Waist beads are a traditional African accessory that consist of small glass beads on a string or wire worn around the waist or hips. … In Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, and other West African countries, waist beads are a symbol of femininity, fertility, sensuality, and spiritual well-being.

Can African waist beads be shown?

Waist beads are also found in other cultures, and while African and Islamic women typically keep them under wraps, some display the beads over their clothes or on bare midriffs, such as belly dancers in Eastern cultures.

What does the Bible say about waist beads?

There are no verses in the Bible or Quran that speaks against wearing of African beads. Even if there is, African waist beads are fashionable and our forebears wore them with a great sense of dignity.

Do waist beads prevent pregnancy?

New natural method of family planning over 95% effective in preventing pregnancy, study finds. Research shows that women who use CycleBeads correctly are able to avoid unplanned pregnancies more than 95% of the time.

What color are fertility waist beads?

Embrace the symbolism of fertility with these waist beads made of shades of green glass seed beads with metallic clasps.

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How do I choose my waist beads?

Depending on how you want to wear your waistbeads, you can measure yourself above your navel, just at your navel, or right above your hips. Use a tape measure and measure against your bare skin without sucking in your stomach. You shouldn’t hold the tape loose nor too snug. Think about where you want to wear the beads.

What does clear waist beads mean?

Icy – Clear Waist Beads

In African culture, Clear stands for gifted and clever. Learn more about the meaning of colors here.

What are the benefits of wearing waist beads?

The waist beads are designed to help with controlling weight gain in a woman. The beadwork is used as trackers for your waist and hips area, and it keeps track of what area of your body has gained weight or, where it lost some weight.

How many waist beads should I wear?

You can wear as few or as many waist beads as you feel comfortable in. Most women wear about 3 strands. Do I take them off? Traditional tie waist beads are semi-permanent and can be worn while bathing, swimming, sleeping, etc.

Do Igbo people wear waist beads?

In Igboland, the only thing we use waist beads (known as jigida in Igbo) for is as a fashion accessory. In those days when young girls wore a two piece attire made up of a skirt wrapper and a piece of cloth tied around the waist, jigida was worn around the waist to sort of cover the belly area.