Why did the Portuguese come to Ghana?

Historically, Ghana-European trading dates back to 1471, where the Portuguese first arrived in Gold Coast. The initial Portuguese interest in trading for gold, ivory, and pepper so increased that in 1482 the Portuguese built their first permanent trading post on the western coast of present-day Ghana.

Why did the Portuguese came to Ghana?

The Portuguese were the first to arrive. By 1471, under the patronage of Prince Henry the Navigator, they had reached the area that was to become known as the Gold Coast because Europeans knew the area as the source of gold that reached Muslim North Africa by way of trade routes across the Sahara.

When did the Portuguese come to Ghana?

The most momentous discovery in western Africa, however, came in 1471, when Portuguese captains first reached the coast of modern Ghana between the mouths of the Ankobra and Volta rivers.

What did the Portuguese gave to Ghana?

In 1419, attracted by the stories that linked the region to the gold deposits, the Portuguese arrived in the area of present-day Ghana, which became known as the Gold Coast. There, in 1482, they created the São Jorge da Mina fort.

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Why did the Portuguese come to West Africa?

Portuguese expansion into Africa began with the desire of King John I to gain access to the gold-producing areas of West Africa. … In this way, the Portuguese diverted the trade in gold and slaves away from the trans-Saharan routes causing their decline and increased their own status as a powerful trading nation.

Why did the European come to Ghana?

The Portuguese interest in trading for gold, ivory, and pepper so increased that in 1482 the Portuguese built their first permanent trading post on the western coast of present-day Ghana.

Who led Portuguese to Ghana?

The Portuguese first reached what became known as the Gold Coast in 1471. Prince Henry the Navigator first sent ships to explore the African coast in 1418. The Portuguese had several motives for voyaging south. They were attracted by rumors of fertile African lands that were rich in gold and ivory.

Why did Europeans first go to Africa?

Europeans first became interested in Africa for trade route purposes. They were looking for ways to avoid the taxes of the Arab and Ottoman empires in Southwest Asia. Sailing around Africa was the obvious choice, but it was a long voyage and could not be completed without “pit stops” along the way.

What did the European brought to Ghana?

Initially Europe’s main interest in the country was as a source of gold, a commodity that was readily available on the coast in exchange for such European exports as cloth, hardware, beads, metals, spirits, arms, and ammunition. This gave rise to the name Gold Coast, by which the country was known until 1957.

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Which tribe came to Ghana first?

The true established Ghanaians in the pre-colonial are the Akans and specifically the Bono’s. It is believed that the Bono’s have settled in this land as early as in the 11th and 16th Centuries. Ga people crept in later. Ewe people were then part of Togoland.

Where did the Portuguese settled first in Ghana?

In 1482, the Portuguese built the first castle in the Gold Coast at Elmina to enhance their trading activities especially in gold and slaves. By 1598, the Dutch also arrived in the Gold Coast to trade. They built forts along the coastal areas, notable among them being the Dutch fort at Komenda.

Which European country came to Ghana after Portugal?

These were the Gold Coast itself, Ashanti, the Northern Territories Protectorate and the British Togoland trust territory. The first European explorers to arrive at the coast were the Portuguese in 1471.

Gold Coast (British colony)

Colony of the Gold Coast
Today part of Ghana

What was the primary motive for the Portuguese exploration of Africa?

Motivated by the desire for new markets and an ongoing opposition to the Muslims, Portuguese sailors had begun to explore the West African coast in the first half of the fifteenth century.